Feature Image

MANMADE

Michael Garlitz, MFA Ceramics Exhibition

Feb 26, 2013 - Mar 1, 2013

An exhibition of works by Michael Garlitz.

  • Art Piece by Michael Garlitz
  • Art Piece by Michael Garlitz
  • Art Piece by Michael Garlitz
  • MANMADE, Michael Garlitz, MFA Ceramics, Spring 2013, Cora Stafford, First Floor
  • MANMADE, Michael Garlitz, MFA Ceramics, Spring 2013, Cora Stafford, Ground Floor
  • MANMADE, Michael Garlitz, MFA Ceramics, Spring 2013, Cora Stafford, First Floor
  • MANMADE, Michael Garlitz, MFA Ceramics, Spring 2013, Cora Stafford, Ground Floor
  • MANMADE, Michael Garlitz, MFA Ceramics, Spring 2013, Installation
  • MANMADE, Michael Garlitz, MFA Ceramics, Spring 2013, Southwest
  • MANMADE, Michael Garlitz, MFA Ceramics, Spring 2013, Cora Stafford, West Wall
  • MANMADE, Michael Garlitz, MFA Ceramics, Spring 2013, Cora Stafford, Ground Floor

During the twentieth century making objects that inhabit space exploded in every area yet it was manufacturing that created the greatest impact. In particular having the capability to create one object, then repeating that object with exacting precision thousands of times has changed the way society views these objects, and their relation to earlier handmade relics. In contemporary society we tend to view these two elements as separate entities. The urban as ever expanding and artificial while the natural is fluctuating and organic. The contrast that is often seen between these two entities has become the point of connection for my work.

Nevertheless, creating connections has become a prominent part of human existence. Whether it is connections to other people, places, or events our lives are defined by those associations that we form through connections. My ceramic sculptures revolve around the bonds that I have formed and experienced; which reflect my intrigue between natural and manufactured units. By translating these connections through the use of recognizable manufactured unit such as bolts, nails, and screws I have created an alternative symbolic source for containing my expression of the human experience through form. It is through this examination of manufactured objects that I have found humanistic connections inherent within each inspirational form. Rather than presenting a banal package complete with an image and a corresponding narrative, leaving little or no room for viewer engagement. I want my work to reach out on a visceral as well as a cognitive level. There is meaning that can be articulated, and there is meaning that needs to be experienced. Clay is an ideal medium for that expression. Since the onset of civilization, it has been used as a building and modeling material. Its earthen source connotes the primal, the elemental and still the ceramic form contains a visual warmth, weight and strength, and at the same time, a feeling of fragility.

My ceramic sculptures bear greater power and relevance through ambiguity. They transcend commonality by remaining open, provocative, and to a certain degree unclear like a found relic from earlier time. Each shape whether simple or complex becomes elevated beyond its normal mundane function by dissecting, questioning and manipulating the form. Yet; I am an object-maker, and I attain an unparalleled sense of satisfaction when making something tangible that has a mass; that occupies a space, and has a physical weight in the real world.

1696